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Against the impossible: one of cowboys at maximum speed

28 November 2019

When in Hollywood they ask for someone who can make a cowboy movie with a good hand, James Mangold's name sure appears first in any list. He is not a man we can point to as a total author, but his works, no doubt, always tend to refer to western and he does very well. Cop Land, Walk the Line and Logan are some of the films in which we can see how he approaches the plots with a similar treatment: all his protagonists have the essence, bearing and gallantry of those mounted in the old west. Ford v Ferrari has exactly this same structure.

Let's put aside the ridiculous name with which "Against the impossible" came to Latin America (the impossible is that we can put titles to the movies and that do not look like soap opera names): the film puts us at the moment when the manufacturer of Ford cars decides to enter the racing world after a failed negotiation with Ferrari. In order to compete for you for the Italian brand, they will hire two men with opposite personalities but who know how to team up to achieve what nobody ever thought could be done.

Mangold has a common denominator that allows his films to look: energy. And he studies very well where to focus it and when to use it. With this in mind, it is notorious that his efforts focused very well on the edition, privileging the personality of its protagonists and getting the races to be a true spectacle that manages to put us on the edge of the armchair even when most know the outcome of the story, or intuit it.

It is far from being a perfect movie or a serious proposal, but it is hilarious, exciting and is allowed to flow with the grace of a rider in full control of his horse. In fact, so attached is the cowboy format that horses are replaced by fast cars. What does not change is this defiant and explosive attitude the character of Cristian Bale, a damn damn demon in this of the interpretations, who finds in Matt Damon the ideal comparsa to make him look.

Yes, there is a lot of formula in “Against the impossible”, but the filmmaker takes the plot to the limit, as if it were a race car, when he decides to run butt we only see the smoke and that way of playing with adrenaline makes it Very very effective. The great but it is in the changes of speeds and when it puts brake. To do so, he uses the secondary characters, who break all the vertigo with trivial phrases and forced interventions. Who else they use this resource with is Noah Jupe, who plays the son of the pilot Ken Miles and who appears during the last hour of the film from time to time to show a face of amazement and point out the obvious.

Mangold also dares to play the mystery unnecessarily, trying all the time to put plot traps to increase our interest, a trick that was not necessary because the prodigious assembly of the film is enough to have us captive, even if we did not have a damn idea of how cars work, or technical details, or anything about the world of motor racing.

What "Against the impossible" does for the world of racing is to show why these men are true athletes and the technical and technological importance of these events to build the vehicles in which we move every day. The best, it does an entertaining and full speed mode.

English Version